Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

 

Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

Indian Head, MD
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove (right) recites the Oath of Enlistment led by Marine Col. Stephen E. Redifer, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with CBIRF. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove (right) recites the Oath of Enlistment led by Marine Col. Stephen E. Redifer, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with CBIRF. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer April D. Beldo, fleet master chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (center), and Master Chief Petty Officer Henry Kuedituka (left) pin on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer to Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Master Chief Petty Officer April D. Beldo, fleet master chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (center), and Master Chief Petty Officer Henry Kuedituka (left) pin on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer to Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer Tammy Heap, command master chief for U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, fits a cover with the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer on Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May  4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Master Chief Petty Officer Tammy Heap, command master chief for U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, fits a cover with the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer on Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove pins on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove pins on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Manchester, Conn.-native Sgt. Kyle A. Phelps, a small arms repair/technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Manchester, Conn.-native Sgt. Kyle A. Phelps, a small arms repair/technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Steve E. Redifer, right, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), thanks the Marine and Civilian instructors of the Downey Responder Training Facility following a  CBIRF Basic Operations Coursegraduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Col. Steve E. Redifer, right, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), thanks the Marine and Civilian instructors of the Downey Responder Training Facility following a CBIRF Basic Operations Coursegraduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marietta, Ga.-native Sgt. Benjamin D. Frazier, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marietta, Ga.-native Sgt. Benjamin D. Frazier, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Baltimore-native Sgt. Magnus D. Nnolim, automotive maintenance technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Baltimore-native Sgt. Magnus D. Nnolim, automotive maintenance technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Riverdale, Ga.-native Pfc. Sandre E. Flournoy, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Riverdale, Ga.-native Pfc. Sandre E. Flournoy, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Chesapeake, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Ian N. Beck, infantryman and honor graduate, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Chesapeake, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Ian N. Beck, infantryman and honor graduate, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Akron, Ohio-native Pfc. Bradley J. Keen, aircraft rescue and firefighting specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Akron, Ohio-native Pfc. Bradley J. Keen, aircraft rescue and firefighting specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Orangeburg, S.C.-native Cpl. Cierra M. Woods, warehouse clerk, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Orangeburg, S.C.-native Cpl. Cierra M. Woods, warehouse clerk, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Norfolk, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Jason B. Embile, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Norfolk, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Jason B. Embile, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Galion, Ohio-native Cpl. Stephen J. Musgrave, infantryman, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Galion, Ohio-native Cpl. Stephen J. Musgrave, infantryman, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), addresses the students of a CBIRF Basic Operations Course during a graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), addresses the students of a CBIRF Basic Operations Course during a graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Harrisonburg, Va.-native 1st Sgt. Matthew A. Moore, left, company first sergeant of headquarters and service company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), shakes hands with Patrick Higgins, Downey Responder Training Facility lead instructor with CBIRF prior to a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Harrisonburg, Va.-native 1st Sgt. Matthew A. Moore, left, company first sergeant of headquarters and service company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), shakes hands with Patrick Higgins, Downey Responder Training Facility lead instructor with CBIRF prior to a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Lt. Cmdr. Mark A. McDowell, command chaplain with the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFOROM), leads CBIRF in a prayer during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Lt. Cmdr. Mark A. McDowell, command chaplain with the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFOROM), leads CBIRF in a prayer during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016.
In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
On the fast track: Manhattan, Kansas-native meritoriously promoted to Corporal
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016. In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016.
In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
On the fast track: Manhattan, Kansas-native meritoriously promoted to Corporal
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016. In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016.
In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
On the fast track: Manhattan, Kansas-native meritoriously promoted to Corporal
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016. In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016.
In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
On the fast track: Manhattan, Kansas-native meritoriously promoted to Corporal
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016. In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016.
In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
On the fast track: Manhattan, Kansas-native meritoriously promoted to Corporal
Manhattan, Kan.-native Gunnar A. Naughton, a team member with the Identification and Detection Platoon (IDP), Reaction Force Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is meritoriously promoted the rank of corporal during a battalion formation at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 2, 2016. In the Marine Corps, the rank of corporal is the first noncommissioned officer level rank, and corporals have a responsibility to their subordinates and superiors unlike any other. Naughton competed against three other CBIRF Marines on a meritorious board of his superiors to be selected for this promotion. On a meritorious board, Marines are selected based on multiple factors including physical fitness, military appearance and Marine Corps Knowledge in order to assess whether the Marine is ready to take on the responsibilities and duties of a higher grade. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Lafayette, La. Native CBIRF Marine promoted to master sergeant
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Lafayette, La. Native CBIRF Marine promoted to master sergeant
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Lafayette, La. Native CBIRF Marine promoted to master sergeant
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Lafayette, La. Native CBIRF Marine promoted to master sergeant
Lafayette, La.- Native Nester G. Antoine Jr., a Marine Military Policeman and Reaction Force Company Gunnery Sergeant, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), is promoted (frocked) to the rank of master sergeant at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), Indian Head, Md., March 1, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), participate in tug-of-war competition during a battalion-wide physical training (PT) session. CBIRF Corporals led the battalion in a PT event ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
CBIRF Corporals lead battalion PT
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), participate in tug-of-war competition during a battalion-wide physical training (PT) session. CBIRF Corporals led the battalion in a PT event ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Upland, Calif.-Native Sgt. Matthew Bentley, a data systems technician with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), fireman carries another Marine during a battalion-wide physical training (PT) session. CBIRF Corporals led the battalion in a PT event ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
CBIRF Corporals lead battalion PT
Upland, Calif.-Native Sgt. Matthew Bentley, a data systems technician with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), fireman carries another Marine during a battalion-wide physical training (PT) session. CBIRF Corporals led the battalion in a PT event ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Corporals with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM) led CBIRF in a battalion-wide physical training session ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits.(Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
CBIRF Corporals lead battalion PT
Corporals with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM) led CBIRF in a battalion-wide physical training session ranging from pushups and lunges to buddy drags and fireman carry drills the morning before their graduation from Corporals Leadership Course, Feb. 26, 2016. The noncommissioned officers completed the 3 week course curriculum that included sword and guidon manual, land navigation, Marine Corps promotion system for sergeants and below and other small unit leader skills and traits.(Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Mission
When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.