Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

 

Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

Indian Head, MD
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, outgoing company commander with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, gives remarks during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella thanked his family for support during his tour at CBIRF and said it was an honor to lead the Marines and sailors of the company. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejiacabrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, outgoing company commander with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, gives remarks during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella thanked his family for support during his tour at CBIRF and said it was an honor to lead the Marines and sailors of the company. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejiacabrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company Conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, render a salute during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, render a salute during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD  ::  Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, take part in a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD :: Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, take part in a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella (right) passes the Headquarters and Service Company guidon to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. This Marine Corps drill movement symbolizes the passing of authority from outgoing to incoming company commander. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella (right) passes the Headquarters and Service Company guidon to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. This Marine Corps drill movement symbolizes the passing of authority from outgoing to incoming company commander. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, bow their head for an invocation given during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, bow their head for an invocation given during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter (right), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter (right), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from military bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. For Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from military bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. For Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the local Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in LINKS for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility on June 30. Indian Head, MD. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the local Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in LINKS for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility on June 30. Indian Head, MD. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
James E. Leonard (left), chief of Fire Department of New York (FDNY), speaks with Col. Michael L. Carter (center), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, and Sgt. Maj. Brian Taylor, sergeant major of CBIRF, during a training exercise between CBIRF and FDNY at Fire Department of New York Fire Academy, June 23, 2016.
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
James E. Leonard (left), chief of Fire Department of New York (FDNY), speaks with Col. Michael L. Carter (center), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, and Sgt. Maj. Brian Taylor, sergeant major of CBIRF, during a training exercise between CBIRF and FDNY at Fire Department of New York Fire Academy, June 23, 2016. Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
ISRAEL – An 8-man team from Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, represented the unit with 74 other American service members during Exercise United Front V in Israel, June 17-25, 2016.
Other units that participated in the exercise included the Indiana 19th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package – 19th CERF-P; Indiana Task Force 1; Virginia Task Force 1; Bloomington Fire Department; Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region; and 120th Public Affairs Department. (Courtesy Photo)
CBIRF detachment participates in Israeli Exercise ‘United Front V’, enhances global deployability
ISRAEL – An 8-man team from Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, represented the unit with 74 other American service members during Exercise United Front V in Israel, June 17-25, 2016. Other units that participated in the exercise included the Indiana 19th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package – 19th CERF-P; Indiana Task Force 1; Virginia Task Force 1; Bloomington Fire Department; Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region; and 120th Public Affairs Department. (Courtesy Photo)
ISRAEL – An 8-man team from Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, represented the unit with 74 other American service members during Exercise United Front V in Israel, June 17-25, 2016.
Other units that participated in the exercise included the Indiana 19th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package – 19th CERF-P; Indiana Task Force 1; Virginia Task Force 1; Bloomington Fire Department; Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region; and 120th Public Affairs Department.
The exercise, hosted by the Israeli Defense Force and coordinated by the Indiana National Guard, strengthened existing bilateral relationships by ensuring interoperability with other military services, and civilian as well as international agencies to improve search and extraction capabilities of all participating units. (Courtesy Photo
CBIRF detachment participates in Israeli Exercise ‘United Front V’, enhances global deployability
ISRAEL – An 8-man team from Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, represented the unit with 74 other American service members during Exercise United Front V in Israel, June 17-25, 2016. Other units that participated in the exercise included the Indiana 19th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package – 19th CERF-P; Indiana Task Force 1; Virginia Task Force 1; Bloomington Fire Department; Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region; and 120th Public Affairs Department. The exercise, hosted by the Israeli Defense Force and coordinated by the Indiana National Guard, strengthened existing bilateral relationships by ensuring interoperability with other military services, and civilian as well as international agencies to improve search and extraction capabilities of all participating units. (Courtesy Photo
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011.

Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period.

On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated.

While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
EOD Marine receives award for valor at CBIRF
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Warrant Officer Daniel Pare, an explosive ordnance disposal officer, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), receives the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device for heroic service in connection with combat operations against the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving as an explosive ordnance disposal team lead, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Watan Kalay, Gereshk Valley, Afghan., from Apr. 9, 2011 to Oct. 24, 2011. Pare, a native of Bristol, Mass., disposed of more than 47,000 pounds of explosive material including 30 improvised explosive devices and 11 enemy weapons caches during this time period. On July 15, 2011, he rendered aid to a seriously wounded soldier while under heavy enemy fire, and after leaving his covered position, he maneuvered to the wounded soldier and administered critical medical aid until the wounded soldier was evacuated. While further assisting in the defense of his unit’s position, Pare located a spotter for enemy mortars and directly engaged him with a M2CG recoilless rifle system, ultimately succeeding in neutralizing the enemy observer and decimating the enemy’s will to persist. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Santiago G. Colon Jr./Released)
Mission
When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.
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