Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

 

Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

Indian Head, MD
Leadership personnel for Initial Response Force, IRF, A with the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, meet after a deployment drill in preparation for the Democratic National Convention, DNC, in Philadelphia, July 25, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Leadership personnel for Initial Response Force, IRF, A with the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, meet after a deployment drill in preparation for the Democratic National Convention, DNC, in Philadelphia, July 25, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines from the search and extraction platoon, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF line up for accountability after a deployment drill during Democratic National Convention, DNC, in Philadelphia, July 25, 2016.
CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Marines from the search and extraction platoon, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF line up for accountability after a deployment drill during Democratic National Convention, DNC, in Philadelphia, July 25, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Col. Frederic A. Drummond, left, Army colonel with JTF-Shield, meets with Marine Lt. Col. Shaun T. Fitzpatrick, right, executive officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, and mission commander for Initial Response Force B, with CBIRF, discuss plans in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 20, 2016.
 CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.  (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Col. Frederic A. Drummond, left, Army colonel with JTF-Shield, meets with Marine Lt. Col. Shaun T. Fitzpatrick, right, executive officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, and mission commander for Initial Response Force B, with CBIRF, discuss plans in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 20, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Sgt. Brian T. Brown, IRF operations chief, for Initial Response Force, IRF, Bravo, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, speaks to Marines and sailors after a deployment drill during the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 19, 2016.
CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Sgt. Brian T. Brown, IRF operations chief, for Initial Response Force, IRF, Bravo, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, speaks to Marines and sailors after a deployment drill during the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 19, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, hold their sealed filters during a gear inspection in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 19, 2016.
CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Marines with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, hold their sealed filters during a gear inspection in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 19, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Sgt. Alfred Eldredge, a motor vehicle operator with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, inspects his M53 gas mask for any damages in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016.
CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Sgt. Alfred Eldredge, a motor vehicle operator with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, inspects his M53 gas mask for any damages in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, inspect their M53 gas mask and sealed filters in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016.
CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Marines with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, inspect their M53 gas mask and sealed filters in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning t o a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Cpl. Eric A. Fox a rifleman with the reaction platoon and bus driver for Initial Response Force B, or IRF B, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, reviews the given route book during a deployment drill in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 17, 2016.
 CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.  (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Cpl. Eric A. Fox a rifleman with the reaction platoon and bus driver for Initial Response Force B, or IRF B, with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, reviews the given route book during a deployment drill in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 17, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Sgt. Brian T. Brown, right, Initial Response Force, or IRF, operations chief, and Staff Sgt. Kevin W. Brown, left, staff noncommissioned officer in charge for IRF B, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, discuss plans in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016.
 CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.
CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.  (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions
Sgt. Brian T. Brown, right, Initial Response Force, or IRF, operations chief, and Staff Sgt. Kevin W. Brown, left, staff noncommissioned officer in charge for IRF B, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, discuss plans in preparation for the Republican National Convention, RNC, in Cleveland, July 18, 2016. CBIRF’s Marines and sailors worked alongside federal and local agencies to provide chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives, CBRNE, response capability for the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Justin R. Gates with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of gunnery sergeant by his wife and Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a promotion/reenlistment ceremony at the National Museum of the Marine Corps at Triangle, Va., Aug. 1, 2016. Gates works as a ground electrician system maintenance mechanic and runs the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, MCMAP, for CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Justin R. Gates with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of gunnery sergeant by his wife and Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a promotion/reenlistment ceremony at the National Museum of the Marine Corps at Triangle, Va., Aug. 1, 2016. Gates works as a ground electrician system maintenance mechanic and runs the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, MCMAP, for CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
Justin R. Gates with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, recites the reenlistment oath given by Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a promotion/ reenlistment ceremony at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, Triangle, Va., Aug. 1, 2016. Gates works as a ground electrician system maintenance mechanic and runs the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, MCMAP, for CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Justin R. Gates with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, recites the reenlistment oath given by Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a promotion/ reenlistment ceremony at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, Triangle, Va., Aug. 1, 2016. Gates works as a ground electrician system maintenance mechanic and runs the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, MCMAP, for CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
Joseph A. Grillo with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was meritoriously promoted to the rank of sergeant during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 2, 2016. Grillo works as a refrigeration/air conditioning technician for the S4 shop at CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Joseph A. Grillo with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was meritoriously promoted to the rank of sergeant during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 2, 2016. Grillo works as a refrigeration/air conditioning technician for the S4 shop at CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
Jaime J. Zamora with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Zamora works as a motor vehicle operator for the motor transport platoon at CBIRF (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Jaime J. Zamora with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Zamora works as a motor vehicle operator for the motor transport platoon at CBIRF (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
Sandre E. Flournoy with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of lance corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Flournoy works as a logistic embarkation specialist for the S4 shop at CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Sandre E. Flournoy with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of lance corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Flournoy works as a logistic embarkation specialist for the S4 shop at CBIRF. (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
Gerardo R. Paicoeusebio with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of lance corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Paicoeusebio works as an electrician for the S4 shop at CBIRF (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
August 2016 Promotions
Gerardo R. Paicoeusebio with Chemical Biological Incident Force, CBIRF, was pinned to the rank of lance corporal during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, Md. August 1, 2016. Paicoeusebio works as an electrician for the S4 shop at CBIRF (Official USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick Mejia)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, outgoing company commander with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, gives remarks during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella thanked his family for support during his tour at CBIRF and said it was an honor to lead the Marines and sailors of the company. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejiacabrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, outgoing company commander with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, gives remarks during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella thanked his family for support during his tour at CBIRF and said it was an honor to lead the Marines and sailors of the company. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejiacabrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company Conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD  ::  Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, take part in a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD :: Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, take part in a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, bow their head for an invocation given during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, bow their head for an invocation given during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, render a salute during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, CBIRF, render a salute during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec assumed command from Capt. Lucas H. Forcella, and the two gave remarks during the ceremony thanking their leadership and families. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella (right) passes the Headquarters and Service Company guidon to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. This Marine Corps drill movement symbolizes the passing of authority from outgoing to incoming company commander. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Capt. Lucas H. Forcella (right) passes the Headquarters and Service Company guidon to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec during a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. This Marine Corps drill movement symbolizes the passing of authority from outgoing to incoming company commander. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter (right), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, MD -- Col. Michael L. Carter (right), commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, presents Capt. Lucas H. Forcella with a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal following a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., July 13, 2016. Forcella served as the company commander for Headquarters and Service Company and relinquished command to Capt. Robert G. Ukrainec. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Middle School teens from military bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. For Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from military bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. For Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the local Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in LINKS for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility on June 30. Indian Head, MD. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the local Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in LINKS for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility on June 30. Indian Head, MD. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. (Photos by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/ RELEASED)
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall host L.I.N.K.S. for Teens
Middle School teens from the Department of Defense bases around South Maryland and Virginia participated in L.I.N.K.S. for Teens at the Naval Surface Facility Indian Head, Md., June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by Chemical, Biological, Incident Response Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. The Teens participated in seven different stations related to the physical and mental preparation a Marine goes under on a daily basis. The teens learned various different skills to build teamwork and camaraderie between peers, as well as the core values of the Marines and goals for the future. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics
Marines and Sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force train alongside the Fire Department of New York for a field training exercise at the F.D.N.Y. training academy in Randall’s Island, N.Y. June 20, 2016. CBIRF is an active duty Marine Corps unit that, when directed, forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photo by Lance Cpl. Maverick S. Mejia/RELEASED)
Mission
When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.
CBIRF News
CBIRF provides CBRNE response capabilities to JTF-Shield, JTF-DNC during Republican and Democratic National Conventions August 16, 2016
Headquarters and Service Company conducts change of command ceremony July 19, 2016
CBIRF and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall hosts L.I.N.K.S. for Teens July 2, 2016
CBIRF and FDNY train side-by-side, share search and rescue tactics June 28, 2016
CBIRF detachment participates in Israeli Exercise ‘United Front V’, enhances global deployability June 27, 2016
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