Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

 

Chemical Biological Incident Response Force

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

Indian Head, MD
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) stands in formation during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) stands in formation during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) march in formation during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) march in formation during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) stand at attention during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of CBIRF, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM),  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) stand at attention during its Change of Command Ceremony. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of CBIRF, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM), from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Master Chief Petty Officer Mercedes Hargrove, left, Navy senior enlisted advisor for Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), speaks to Sgt. Maj. Christopher Robinson, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM)  sergeant major, prior to CBIRF change of command. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of CBIRF, MARFORCOM,  from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Colonel Carter assumes command of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force
NAVAL SUPPORT FACILITY INDIAN HEAD, Md. – Master Chief Petty Officer Mercedes Hargrove, left, Navy senior enlisted advisor for Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), speaks to Sgt. Maj. Christopher Robinson, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM) sergeant major, prior to CBIRF change of command. Col. Michael L. Carter assumed command of CBIRF, MARFORCOM, from Col. Stephen E. Redifer during a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 18, 2016. Carter thanked Redifer for his outstanding work with CBIRF and said he was thankful for the opportunity to take command of the Nation’s premier chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) consequence management and incident response force in readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove (right) recites the Oath of Enlistment led by Marine Col. Stephen E. Redifer, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with CBIRF. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove (right) recites the Oath of Enlistment led by Marine Col. Stephen E. Redifer, commanding officer of Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with CBIRF. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer April D. Beldo, fleet master chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (center), and Master Chief Petty Officer Henry Kuedituka (left) pin on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer to Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Master Chief Petty Officer April D. Beldo, fleet master chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (center), and Master Chief Petty Officer Henry Kuedituka (left) pin on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer to Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer Tammy Heap, command master chief for U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, fits a cover with the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer on Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May  4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Master Chief Petty Officer Tammy Heap, command master chief for U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, fits a cover with the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer on Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove pins on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Sailor Makes CBIRF History
Richmond, Va.-native Mercedes N. Hargrove pins on the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer during a promotion ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., May 4, 2016. Hargrove serves as the Navy Senior Enlisted Leader with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. (Official USMC Photo by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera/Released)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
CBIRF Marine become Corps' newest Staff NCO
Tucson, Ariz.-Native Luis A. Ochoa, an embarker with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force is promoted to the rank of staff sergeant during a ceremony at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF) headquarters aboard Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., April 4, 2016. When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan Herrera)
Manchester, Conn.-native Sgt. Kyle A. Phelps, a small arms repair/technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Manchester, Conn.-native Sgt. Kyle A. Phelps, a small arms repair/technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Col. Steve E. Redifer, right, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), thanks the Marine and Civilian instructors of the Downey Responder Training Facility following a  CBIRF Basic Operations Coursegraduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Col. Steve E. Redifer, right, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), thanks the Marine and Civilian instructors of the Downey Responder Training Facility following a CBIRF Basic Operations Coursegraduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Baltimore-native Sgt. Magnus D. Nnolim, automotive maintenance technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Baltimore-native Sgt. Magnus D. Nnolim, automotive maintenance technician, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marietta, Ga.-native Sgt. Benjamin D. Frazier, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marietta, Ga.-native Sgt. Benjamin D. Frazier, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Galion, Ohio-native Cpl. Stephen J. Musgrave, infantryman, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Galion, Ohio-native Cpl. Stephen J. Musgrave, infantryman, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Riverdale, Ga.-native Pfc. Sandre E. Flournoy, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Riverdale, Ga.-native Pfc. Sandre E. Flournoy, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Chesapeake, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Ian N. Beck, infantryman and honor graduate, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Chesapeake, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Ian N. Beck, infantryman and honor graduate, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Akron, Ohio-native Pfc. Bradley J. Keen, aircraft rescue and firefighting specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Akron, Ohio-native Pfc. Bradley J. Keen, aircraft rescue and firefighting specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Orangeburg, S.C.-native Cpl. Cierra M. Woods, warehouse clerk, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Orangeburg, S.C.-native Cpl. Cierra M. Woods, warehouse clerk, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Norfolk, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Jason B. Embile, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Norfolk, Va.-native Lance Cpl. Jason B. Embile, logistics/embarkation specialist, left, shakes hands with Col. Steve E. Redifer, commanding officer of the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Corps Force Command (MARFORCOM), during a CBIRF Basic Operations Course graduation ceremony at Naval Support Facility Indian Head, Md., Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine and sailor will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine and sailor with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
CBIRF Marines graduate from Basic Operations Course
Marines and sailors with Chemical Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF), U.S. Marine Forces Command, graduate from the CBIRF Basic Operations Course, Mar. 11, 2016. The course is a three-week program that provides approximately 145 hours of classroom, practical applications and individual and team testing in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) disciplines that meet federal requirements. After graduating the course, each Marine will be qualified to enter a contaminated area, search the area, provide emergency first aid and provide assistance to nonambulatory patients. Regardless of their jobs, or military occupational specialty, every Marine with CBIRF is required to complete the course, making the unit uniquely qualified to respond with minimal warning to a CBRNE threat. (Official USMC Photos by Sgt. Jonathan S. Herrera/Released)
Mission
When directed, CBIRF forward-deploys and/or responds with minimal warning to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or high-yield explosive (CBRNE) threat or event in order to assist local, state, or federal agencies and the geographic combatant commanders in the conduct of CBRNE response or consequence management operations, providing capabilities for command and control; agent detection and identification; search, rescue, and decontamination; and emergency medical care for contaminated personnel.